All About the Barton Creek Greenbelt

The Barton Creek Greenbelt is a beautiful expanse of nature providing multiple opportunities for recreational fun. The main trail stretches over seven miles and is located in Austin, Texas. The Barton Creek Greenbelt is actually a park cared for under the umbrella of the Austin City’s Park and Recreation Department. This park is a great place to visit year-round, because of the mild temperatures in Austin and the surrounding area.

Adventure Awaits You in Barton Creek

The unique and alternative terrain is enjoyed by those who are looking for a little more than your average hiking and biking routes. There are also incredible limestone cliffs that draw people from all over the area to test their endurance and strength on the walls. What’s more, when the water levels rise along the greenbelt, patrons can enjoy swimming, water tubing, and cliff jumping. There are even caves that can be found along the greenbelt for those who want to get closer to the center of the earth, however, due to unforeseen accidents, the caves are only accessible through guided tours.

A very popular and fun festival that takes place each year is the tubing the belt parade that draws hundreds of people with inner tubes to make a lazy run down the greenbelt when the waters are high.

Entry Points

This urban oasis can be difficult to find for visitors to the city. Several entry points are located all over the city, but the easiest way to enter the greenbelt is through the Loop 360 access point because of the convenient parking lot that is adjacent to the entrance to the greenbelt. All of the popular information sites remind drivers to turn right at the lights instead of heading toward the building itself.

Important Points

The trails along the Barton Creek Greenbelt are dog-friendly, and many people enjoy trekking along with their furry friends. You should also know that there is no restroom in the greenbelt, so be prepared for that. You’ll want to plan your visit to the greenbelt after a good bit of rain has fallen. Some of the popular swimming holes don’t have much if any, water during dry spells. You can still hike to the watering holes, but you’ll be walking on dry lakebed, which can be interested in its own right.

If you are looking for a more enduring adventure, make your way along the Barton Creek Greenbelt and divert your route to the Violet Crown Trail, which continues on for another 30 miles once you pass the 4-mile marker on the greenbelt.

The Must See Highlights

The major highlights of the greenbelt are found at Trailhead, the Trail End, Campbell’s Hole (when there has been rain!), and Gaines Creek and Twin Falls. You can explore the entire greenbelt by making the 13-mile trek from the trailhead to trail end in several hours. If you want to try your hand at rock climbing, you’ll want to stop by the Seismic Wall near the Spyglass entry point to the greenbelt.

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